We Are Decubitus Ulcer Lawyers

Decubitus ulcers (bed sores) are easily preventable. They form due to patient neglect. A decubitus ulcer lawyer can get you the answers you need when a loved one develops a decubitus ulcer at a hospital or nursing home. Pressure sore lawsuits are not easy to handle on your own. These claims are not standard personal injury cases. Facilities withhold medical records and alter key pieces of evidence. Bedsore photos “go missing.” Crucial eyewitnesses “forget” about the patient’s wound. Bedsore lawyers can obtain your medical records for you and streamline the discovery process. Nursing homes and hospitals are formidable opponents when you sue them for patient neglect. Do not let yourself be victimized twice. With the help of a skilled decubitus ulcer lawyer, you will have an knowledgeable advocate that is familiar with decubitus ulcer cases. Call us at 561-316-7207 to discuss your case for free.

So what exactly is a Decubitus Ulcer Attorney?

Pressure Sore Lawyer

As bedsore lawyers, we can guide you through the decubitus ulcer legal process

There is no certification that a lawyer can obtain to specialize in decubitus ulcer cases. However, you want to have a nursing home/medical malpractice lawyer who regularly handles pressure sore lawsuits. Make sure the attorney understands what a decubitus ulcer is and how they form. Feel free to use the decubitus ulcer information resources we have on this site for learning about decubitus ulcer facts.

10 Important Questions to Ask your Decubitus Ulcer Lawyer:

1. How do I get my medical records from a hospital? How do I get nursing home medical records?

2. Will you pay to obtain my medical records or will I have to pay for them? (PS- You shouldn’t have to pay!)

3. Is there a mandatory presuit period for bedsore cases in my state? Do I need to obtain an expert medical malpractice affidavit before bringing my pressure sore claim?

4. Will I be forced to arbitrate my case instead of filing a decubitus ulcer lawsuit?

5. Will my case be filed in State Court or Federal Court? Which is preferable in a pressure sore case?

6. Do I have to pay up front for a bedsore lawyer to pursue my case? (You should not!)

7. How much will Medicare and Medicaid (or my private insurance) place as a lien on my recovery in a bedsore lawsuit? How are insurance liens reduced in these kinds of cases?

8. Are there capped damages on my recovery? i.e. Is there a limit to the money I can recover in a decubitus ulcer lawsuit?

9. Can I obtain press/media coverage for the awful care I received at the nursing home/hospital?

10. How long do pressure sore cases take to settle? How much is my decubitus ulcer lawsuit worth?

If you have any questions about your potential bedsore case, call 561-316-7207 or fill out the case evaluator to your right. The consultation is free.

Choose Us as Your Decubitus Ulcer Lawyers: It’s What We Do

The majority of the cases I handle are for patient neglect against hospitals and nursing homes, most of which involve decubitus ulcers. In fact, more than half of my caseload involves this specific injury. This means that I am intimately familiar with the causes of decubitus ulcers, the experts needed to testify in these kinds of cases, as well as the value of decubitus ulcer lawsuits. To learn more about us, what we do and why we care, click here.

Pressure Ulcer Attorney

Michael, our decubitus ulcer lawyer.

When hiring a decubitus ulcer lawyer, make sure that they regularly settle and try bedsore cases. Also make sure that the lawyer listens to you and cares about your loss. A decubitus ulcer lawsuit is emotional. These cases involve extreme patient neglect bordering on patient abuse. Make sure your decubitus ulcer lawyer appreciates your outrage. For some clients, its about obtaining money for the pain, suffering and medical care incurred. But for others, its about obtaining justice. Make sure your decubitus ulcer lawyer can do both.

Free Consultation: 561-316-7207

Speak with our decubitus ulcer attorney today.

 

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